Cultural Heritage Imaging


Greek red-figure vases, two surface examination methods and fabricated mock-ups by marlinlum

A linierhaar made of human hair is used to produce looped laid lines similar to that seen in Fig. 10 (left) (photo by Kari Kipper). A 3D elevation map of one such fabricated looped line displays topographical features distinctly similar to the ancient looped line (right). The threshold setting in the elevation map was adjusted to remove the majority of measurements associated with the cardboard substrate. The dimensions of the elevation map are 1.73 × 2.9 mm. The elevation scale bar is in μm.

Paula Artal-Isbrand and Philip Klausmeyer recently published an article in the Studies in Conservation journal.

Entitled “Evaluation of the relief line and the contour line on Greek red-figure vases using reflectance transformation imaging and three-dimensional laser scanning confocal microscopy,” the article examines “…the relief and contour lines on a group of ancient Greek red-figure vases and vase fragments.”

Paula and Philip, both of the Worcester Art Museum in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, describe how they deployed “… two surface examination methods – reflectance transformation imaging and three-dimensional laser scanning confocal microscopy” to “… characterize the lines and answer questions regarding tools, techniques, and production sequence used by Greek vase painters.”

Their work is interesting and empirical, with numerous examples that yield detailed observations about the tools and techniques used to create the decorative features on vases and vase fragments, with a particular emphasis on relief and contour lines.

Download the entire PDF:

Evaluation of the relief line and the contour line on Greek red-figure vases using reflectance transformation imaging and three-dimensional laser scanning confocal microscopy

 

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